China manufacturer Vacuum Pump, Single-Stage Rotary Vane Pump EU300h, Oil Rotary Vane Vacuum Pump Imported From Italy wholesaler

Product Description

Product Description

EU160/EU205/EU300

Ultimate pressure:

≤ 0,5 and ≤ 10 mbar

Pumping speed:

152÷360 m3/h

 

TheEU 160,EU 205andEU 300are single-stage rotary vane lubricated pumps with oil recirculation.

The flanged electric motor is coupled by an elastic coupling.

Cooling is ensured by an air-oil heat exchanger and with a centrifugal fan.

An integrated check valve prevents the oil from coming back and the return of air into the chamber to be pumped down during the stop phase.

The oil tank is provided with a system for separating the oil mists from the exhaust air; the separated oil is automatically recovered from the pump.

The gas ballasts prevent condensation inside the pump when small quantities of steam are sucked.

 

The EU 160, EU 205 and EU 300 series pumps are suitable for the evacuation of closed systems or to operate at a constant vacuum included in the following range:

 

EU 160 – EU 205 – EU 300 from 0,5 to 300 mbar (absolute)

EU 160 B – EU 205 B – EU 300 B from 10 to 850 mbar (absolute)

 

 

ACCESSORIES

The following accessories are useful for the installation and for the control of the pump operation parameters:

  External suction filter

  •   Vacuum gauges / vacuostats

  •   Pressure gauges / pressure switches

  •   Thermostat

  •   Minimum oil level switch

Main specifications

 

   

 

 

EU160

EU205

EU300

Pumping speed

m³/h

50Hz

152

205

290

60Hz

182

245

360

Ultimate pressure with gas ballast (abs.)

mbar

 

≤ 0,5

(≤ 10 /B)

≤ 0,5

(≤ 10 /B)

≤ 0,5

(≤ 10 /B)

Motor power

kW

50Hz

3

4

5,5

60Hz

4

5,5

7,5

Motor speed

rpm

50Hz

1500

1500

1500

60Hz

1800

1800

1800

Water vapour tolerance

mbar

 

30

30

30

Water vapour pumping capacity

kg/h

 

3

3.6

5

Lubricant charge

l

 

3

7

7

Sound pressure level

dB(A)

50Hz

71

70

71

60Hz

72

72

73

Dimensions

L x B x H

mm

50Hz

805x436x348

895x551x436

979x551x436

60Hz

814x436x348

944x551x436

1019x551x436

Weight

kg

50Hz

104

161

188

60Hz

110

171

192

Connections*

Inlet

 

1″ ½ Gas

2″ Gas

2″ Gas

Outlet

 

1″ ½ Gas

2″ Gas

2″ Gas

* Other types of connection available CHINAMFG request

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After-sales Service: 12 Months From Date of Start-up or 15 Months From
Warranty: 12 Months From Date of Start-up or 15 Months From
Oil or Not: Oil
Structure: Rotary Vacuum Pump
Exhauster Method: Entrapment Vacuum Pump
Vacuum Degree: Vacuum
Customization:
Available

|

vacuum pump

How Are Vacuum Pumps Employed in the Production of Electronic Components?

Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in the production of electronic components. Here’s a detailed explanation:

The production of electronic components often requires controlled environments with low or no atmospheric pressure. Vacuum pumps are employed in various stages of the production process to create and maintain these vacuum conditions. Here are some key ways in which vacuum pumps are used in the production of electronic components:

1. Deposition Processes: Vacuum pumps are extensively used in deposition processes, such as physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which are commonly employed for thin film deposition on electronic components. These processes involve the deposition of materials onto substrates in a vacuum chamber. Vacuum pumps help create and maintain the necessary vacuum conditions required for precise and controlled deposition of the thin films.

2. Etching and Cleaning: Etching and cleaning processes are essential in the fabrication of electronic components. Vacuum pumps are used to create a vacuum environment in etching and cleaning chambers, where reactive gases or plasmas are employed to remove unwanted materials or residues from the surfaces of the components. The vacuum pumps help evacuate the chamber and ensure the efficient removal of byproducts and waste gases.

3. Drying and Bake-out: Vacuum pumps are utilized in the drying and bake-out processes of electronic components. After wet processes, such as cleaning or wet etching, components need to be dried thoroughly. Vacuum pumps help create a vacuum environment that facilitates the removal of moisture or solvents from the components, ensuring their dryness before subsequent processing steps. Additionally, vacuum bake-out is employed to remove moisture or other contaminants trapped within the components’ materials or structures, enhancing their reliability and performance.

4. Encapsulation and Packaging: Vacuum pumps are involved in the encapsulation and packaging stages of electronic component production. These processes often require the use of vacuum-sealed packaging to protect the components from environmental factors such as moisture, dust, or oxidation. Vacuum pumps assist in evacuating the packaging materials, creating a vacuum-sealed environment that helps maintain the integrity and longevity of the electronic components.

5. Testing and Quality Control: Vacuum pumps are utilized in testing and quality control processes for electronic components. Some types of testing, such as hermeticity testing, require the creation of a vacuum environment for evaluating the sealing integrity of electronic packages. Vacuum pumps help evacuate the testing chambers, ensuring accurate and reliable test results.

6. Soldering and Brazing: Vacuum pumps play a role in soldering and brazing processes for joining electronic components and assemblies. Vacuum soldering is a technique used to achieve high-quality solder joints by removing air and reducing the risk of voids, flux residuals, or oxidation. Vacuum pumps assist in evacuating the soldering chambers, creating the required vacuum conditions for precise and reliable soldering or brazing.

7. Surface Treatment: Vacuum pumps are employed in surface treatment processes for electronic components. These processes include plasma cleaning, surface activation, or surface modification techniques. Vacuum pumps help create the necessary vacuum environment where plasma or reactive gases are used to treat the component surfaces, improving adhesion, promoting bonding, or altering surface properties.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps may be used in electronic component production, depending on the specific process requirements. Commonly used vacuum pump technologies include rotary vane pumps, turbo pumps, cryogenic pumps, and dry pumps.

In summary, vacuum pumps are essential in the production of electronic components, facilitating deposition processes, etching and cleaning operations, drying and bake-out stages, encapsulation and packaging, testing and quality control, soldering and brazing, as well as surface treatment. They enable the creation and maintenance of controlled vacuum environments, ensuring precise and reliable manufacturing processes for electronic components.

vacuum pump

How Do Vacuum Pumps Assist in Freeze-Drying Processes?

Freeze-drying, also known as lyophilization, is a dehydration technique used in various industries, including pharmaceutical manufacturing. Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in facilitating freeze-drying processes. Here’s a detailed explanation:

During freeze-drying, vacuum pumps assist in the removal of water or solvents from pharmaceutical products while preserving their structure and integrity. The freeze-drying process involves three main stages: freezing, primary drying (sublimation), and secondary drying (desorption).

1. Freezing: In the first stage, the pharmaceutical product is frozen to a solid state. Freezing is typically achieved by lowering the temperature of the product below its freezing point. The frozen product is then placed in a vacuum chamber.

2. Primary Drying (Sublimation): Once the product is frozen, the vacuum pump creates a low-pressure environment within the chamber. By reducing the pressure, the boiling point of water or solvents present in the frozen product is lowered, allowing them to transition directly from the solid phase to the vapor phase through a process called sublimation. Sublimation bypasses the liquid phase, preventing potential damage to the product’s structure.

The vacuum pump maintains a low-pressure environment by continuously removing the water vapor or solvent vapor generated during sublimation. The vapor is drawn out of the chamber, leaving behind the freeze-dried product. This process preserves the product’s original form, texture, and biological activity.

3. Secondary Drying (Desorption): After the majority of the water or solvents have been removed through sublimation, the freeze-dried product may still contain residual moisture or solvents. In the secondary drying stage, the vacuum pump continues to apply vacuum to the chamber, but at a higher temperature. The purpose of this stage is to remove the remaining moisture or solvents through evaporation.

The vacuum pump maintains the low-pressure environment, allowing the residual moisture or solvents to evaporate at a lower temperature than under atmospheric pressure. This prevents potential thermal degradation of the product. Secondary drying further enhances the stability and shelf life of the freeze-dried pharmaceutical product.

By creating and maintaining a low-pressure environment, vacuum pumps enable efficient and controlled sublimation and desorption during the freeze-drying process. They facilitate the removal of water or solvents while minimizing the potential damage to the product’s structure and preserving its quality. Vacuum pumps also contribute to the overall speed and efficiency of the freeze-drying process by continuously removing the vapor generated during sublimation and evaporation. The precise control provided by vacuum pumps ensures the production of stable and high-quality freeze-dried pharmaceutical products.

vacuum pump

What Is a Vacuum Pump, and How Does It Work?

A vacuum pump is a mechanical device used to create and maintain a vacuum or low-pressure environment within a closed system. Here’s a detailed explanation:

A vacuum pump operates on the principle of removing gas molecules from a sealed chamber, reducing the pressure inside the chamber to create a vacuum. The pump accomplishes this through various mechanisms and techniques, depending on the specific type of vacuum pump. Here are the basic steps involved in the operation of a vacuum pump:

1. Sealed Chamber:

The vacuum pump is connected to a sealed chamber or system from which air or gas molecules need to be evacuated. The chamber can be a container, a pipeline, or any other enclosed space.

2. Inlet and Outlet:

The vacuum pump has an inlet and an outlet. The inlet is connected to the sealed chamber, while the outlet may be vented to the atmosphere or connected to a collection system to capture or release the evacuated gas.

3. Mechanical Action:

The vacuum pump creates a mechanical action that removes gas molecules from the chamber. Different types of vacuum pumps use various mechanisms for this purpose:

– Positive Displacement Pumps: These pumps physically trap gas molecules and remove them from the chamber. Examples include rotary vane pumps, piston pumps, and diaphragm pumps.

– Momentum Transfer Pumps: These pumps use high-speed jets or rotating blades to transfer momentum to gas molecules, pushing them out of the chamber. Examples include turbomolecular pumps and diffusion pumps.

– Entrapment Pumps: These pumps capture gas molecules by adsorbing or condensing them on surfaces or in materials within the pump. Cryogenic pumps and ion pumps are examples of entrainment pumps.

4. Gas Evacuation:

As the vacuum pump operates, it creates a pressure differential between the chamber and the pump. This pressure differential causes gas molecules to move from the chamber to the pump’s inlet.

5. Exhaust or Collection:

Once the gas molecules are removed from the chamber, they are either exhausted into the atmosphere or collected and processed further, depending on the specific application.

6. Pressure Control:

Vacuum pumps often incorporate pressure control mechanisms to maintain the desired level of vacuum within the chamber. These mechanisms can include valves, regulators, or feedback systems that adjust the pump’s operation to achieve the desired pressure range.

7. Monitoring and Safety:

Vacuum pump systems may include sensors, gauges, or indicators to monitor the pressure levels, temperature, or other parameters. Safety features such as pressure relief valves or interlocks may also be included to protect the system and operators from overpressure or other hazardous conditions.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps have varying levels of vacuum they can achieve and are suitable for different pressure ranges and applications. The choice of vacuum pump depends on factors such as the required vacuum level, gas composition, pumping speed, and the specific application’s requirements.

In summary, a vacuum pump is a device that removes gas molecules from a sealed chamber, creating a vacuum or low-pressure environment. The pump accomplishes this through mechanical actions, such as positive displacement, momentum transfer, or entrapment. By creating a pressure differential, the pump evacuates gas from the chamber, and the gas is either exhausted or collected. Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in various industries, including manufacturing, research, and scientific applications.

China manufacturer Vacuum Pump, Single-Stage Rotary Vane Pump EU300h, Oil Rotary Vane Vacuum Pump Imported From Italy   wholesaler China manufacturer Vacuum Pump, Single-Stage Rotary Vane Pump EU300h, Oil Rotary Vane Vacuum Pump Imported From Italy   wholesaler
editor by CX 2024-02-10

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