China Good quality Optical Industry Roots Vacuum Pumps vacuum pump electric

Product Description

MBC100 Mechanical Boosters / Roots Vacuum Pumps 

Our MB-C, MB-E, and MB-Y mechanical vacuum booster are oil free vacuum pumps that are running together with the backing pumps for all rough and high-vacuum applications where large pumping speeds are needed. Our vacuum boosters operate totally contact-free and with no sealing fluids such as oil or water exiting in the vacuum chamber. MB-Y vacuum boosters are equipped with bypass valve.

Economical
Due to the large number of available models, the pumping speed and ultimate vacuum can be customized exactly according to specific processes. The high pumping efficiency ensures further increase in the economy of operating costs.

Safe operation
Tried-and-tested engineering technology together with a robust design enables safe operation to happen. The MB-Y series’ integrated bypass valve allows the vacuum boosters to operate at a high pressure level.
 

 

Technical data 50HZ MBC5710
Pumping Speed m3/h 100
Ultimate pressure mbar(abs) 1×10-1
Diameter VG50
Voltage V 320-440
Nominal motor rating Kw 0.4
Current A 0.9
Nominal speed Min-1 2885/3600
Sound dB(A) 68
Oil (max) L 0.4
Weight Kg 30

Application Ranges

  • Metallurgy
  • Simulation chambers
  • Packaging industry
  • Freeze/vacuum-drying
  • Thin-film technology
  • Electron beam welding
  • Chemistry and process technology
  • Industrial leak detection systems
  • Steel degassing
  • Load-lock chambers
  • vacuum impregnation
  • vacuum degass
  • vacuum pre-discharging
  • gas exhausting
  • Glass and wear protection coating
  • Decorative coating
  • Vacuum furnaces
  • Space simulation chambers
  • for the processes in vacuum distillation, vacuum concentration and vacuum drying in chemical industry, medicine, food and beverage, light industry and textile industry 

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Oil or Not: Oil
Structure: Roots Vacuum Pump
Exhauster Method: Kinetic Vacuum Pump
Vacuum Degree: Vacuum
Work Function: Maintain the Pump
Working Conditions: Dry
Customization:
Available

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vacuum pump

What Is the Impact of Altitude on Vacuum Pump Performance?

The performance of vacuum pumps can be influenced by the altitude at which they are operated. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Altitude refers to the elevation or height above sea level. As the altitude increases, the atmospheric pressure decreases. This decrease in atmospheric pressure can have several effects on the performance of vacuum pumps:

1. Reduced Suction Capacity: Vacuum pumps rely on the pressure differential between the suction side and the discharge side to create a vacuum. At higher altitudes, where the atmospheric pressure is lower, the pressure differential available for the pump to work against is reduced. This can result in a decrease in the suction capacity of the vacuum pump, meaning it may not be able to achieve the same level of vacuum as it would at lower altitudes.

2. Lower Ultimate Vacuum Level: The ultimate vacuum level, which represents the lowest pressure that a vacuum pump can achieve, is also affected by altitude. As the atmospheric pressure decreases with increasing altitude, the ultimate vacuum level that can be attained by a vacuum pump is limited. The pump may struggle to reach the same level of vacuum as it would at sea level or lower altitudes.

3. Pumping Speed: Pumping speed is a measure of how quickly a vacuum pump can remove gases from a system. At higher altitudes, the reduced atmospheric pressure can lead to a decrease in pumping speed. This means that the vacuum pump may take longer to evacuate a chamber or system to the desired vacuum level.

4. Increased Power Consumption: To compensate for the decreased pressure differential and achieve the desired vacuum level, a vacuum pump operating at higher altitudes may require higher power consumption. The pump needs to work harder to overcome the lower atmospheric pressure and maintain the necessary suction capacity. This increased power consumption can impact energy efficiency and operating costs.

5. Efficiency and Performance Variations: Different types of vacuum pumps may exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to altitude. Oil-sealed rotary vane pumps, for example, may experience more significant performance variations compared to dry pumps or other pump technologies. The design and operating principles of the vacuum pump can influence its ability to maintain performance at higher altitudes.

It’s important to note that vacuum pump manufacturers typically provide specifications and performance curves for their pumps based on standardized conditions, often at or near sea level. When operating a vacuum pump at higher altitudes, it is advisable to consult the manufacturer’s guidelines and consider any altitude-related limitations or adjustments that may be necessary.

In summary, the altitude at which a vacuum pump operates can have an impact on its performance. The reduced atmospheric pressure at higher altitudes can result in decreased suction capacity, lower ultimate vacuum levels, reduced pumping speed, and potentially increased power consumption. Understanding these effects is crucial for selecting and operating vacuum pumps effectively in different altitude environments.

vacuum pump

Can Vacuum Pumps Be Used for Soil and Groundwater Remediation?

Vacuum pumps are indeed widely used for soil and groundwater remediation. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Soil and groundwater remediation refers to the process of removing contaminants from the soil and groundwater to restore environmental quality and protect human health. Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in various remediation techniques by facilitating the extraction and treatment of contaminated media. Some of the common applications of vacuum pumps in soil and groundwater remediation include:

1. Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE): Soil vapor extraction is a widely used remediation technique for volatile contaminants present in the subsurface. It involves the extraction of vapors from the soil by applying a vacuum to the subsurface through wells or trenches. Vacuum pumps create a pressure gradient that induces the movement of vapors towards the extraction points. The extracted vapors are then treated to remove or destroy the contaminants. Vacuum pumps play a vital role in SVE by maintaining the necessary negative pressure to enhance the volatilization and extraction of contaminants from the soil.

2. Dual-Phase Extraction (DPE): Dual-phase extraction is a remediation method used for the simultaneous extraction of both liquids (such as groundwater) and vapors (such as volatile organic compounds) from the subsurface. Vacuum pumps are utilized to create a vacuum in extraction wells or points, drawing out both the liquid and vapor phases. The extracted groundwater and vapors are then separated and treated accordingly. Vacuum pumps are essential in DPE systems for efficient and controlled extraction of both liquid and vapor-phase contaminants.

3. Groundwater Pumping and Treatment: Vacuum pumps are also employed in groundwater remediation through the process of pumping and treatment. They are used to extract contaminated groundwater from wells or recovery trenches. By creating a vacuum or negative pressure, vacuum pumps facilitate the flow of groundwater towards the extraction points. The extracted groundwater is then treated to remove or neutralize the contaminants before being discharged or re-injected into the ground. Vacuum pumps play a critical role in maintaining the required flow rates and hydraulic gradients for effective groundwater extraction and treatment.

4. Air Sparging: Air sparging is a remediation technique used to treat groundwater and soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It involves the injection of air or oxygen into the subsurface to enhance the volatilization of contaminants. Vacuum pumps are utilized in air sparging systems to create a vacuum or negative pressure zone in wells or points surrounding the contaminated area. This induces the movement of air and oxygen through the soil, facilitating the release and volatilization of VOCs. Vacuum pumps are essential in air sparging by maintaining the necessary negative pressure gradient for effective contaminant removal.

5. Vacuum-Enhanced Recovery: Vacuum-enhanced recovery, also known as vacuum-enhanced extraction, is a remediation technique used to recover non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from the subsurface. Vacuum pumps are employed to create a vacuum or negative pressure gradient in recovery wells or trenches. This encourages the movement and extraction of NAPLs or DNAPLs towards the recovery points. Vacuum pumps facilitate the efficient recovery of these dense contaminants, which may not be easily recoverable using traditional pumping methods.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps, such as rotary vane pumps, liquid ring pumps, or air-cooled pumps, may be used in soil and groundwater remediation depending on the specific requirements of the remediation technique and the nature of the contaminants.

In summary, vacuum pumps play a vital role in various soil and groundwater remediation techniques, including soil vapor extraction, dual-phase extraction, groundwater pumping and treatment, air sparging, and vacuum-enhanced recovery. By creating and maintaining the necessary pressure differentials, vacuum pumps enable the efficient extraction, treatment, and removal of contaminants, contributing to the restoration of soil and groundwater quality.

vacuum pump

How Are Vacuum Pumps Different from Air Compressors?

Vacuum pumps and air compressors are both mechanical devices used to manipulate air and gas, but they serve opposite purposes. Here’s a detailed explanation of their differences:

1. Function:

– Vacuum Pumps: Vacuum pumps are designed to remove or reduce the pressure within a closed system, creating a vacuum or low-pressure environment. They extract air or gas from a chamber, creating suction or negative pressure.

– Air Compressors: Air compressors, on the other hand, are used to increase the pressure of air or gas. They take in ambient air or gas and compress it, resulting in higher pressure and a compacted volume of air or gas.

2. Pressure Range:

– Vacuum Pumps: Vacuum pumps are capable of generating pressures below atmospheric pressure or absolute zero pressure. The pressure range typically extends into the negative range, expressed in units such as torr or pascal.

– Air Compressors: Air compressors, on the contrary, operate in the positive pressure range. They increase the pressure above atmospheric pressure, typically measured in units like pounds per square inch (psi) or bar.

3. Applications:

– Vacuum Pumps: Vacuum pumps have various applications where the creation of a vacuum or low-pressure environment is required. They are used in processes such as vacuum distillation, vacuum drying, vacuum packaging, and vacuum filtration. They are also essential in scientific research, semiconductor manufacturing, medical suction devices, and many other industries.

– Air Compressors: Air compressors find applications where compressed air or gas at high pressure is needed. They are used in pneumatic tools, manufacturing processes, air conditioning systems, power generation, and inflating tires. Compressed air is versatile and can be employed in numerous industrial and commercial applications.

4. Design and Mechanism:

– Vacuum Pumps: Vacuum pumps are designed to create a vacuum by removing air or gas from a closed system. They may use mechanisms such as positive displacement, entrapment, or momentum transfer to achieve the desired vacuum level. Examples of vacuum pump types include rotary vane pumps, diaphragm pumps, and diffusion pumps.

– Air Compressors: Air compressors are engineered to compress air or gas, increasing its pressure and decreasing its volume. They use mechanisms like reciprocating pistons, rotary screws, or centrifugal force to compress the air or gas. Common types of air compressors include reciprocating compressors, rotary screw compressors, and centrifugal compressors.

5. Direction of Air/Gas Flow:

– Vacuum Pumps: Vacuum pumps draw air or gas into the pump and then expel it from the system, creating a vacuum within the chamber or system being evacuated.

– Air Compressors: Air compressors take in ambient air or gas and compress it, increasing its pressure and storing it in a tank or delivering it directly to the desired application.

While vacuum pumps and air compressors have different functions and operate under distinct pressure ranges, they are both vital in various industries and applications. Vacuum pumps create and maintain a vacuum or low-pressure environment, while air compressors compress air or gas to higher pressures for different uses and processes.

China Good quality Optical Industry Roots Vacuum Pumps   vacuum pump electricChina Good quality Optical Industry Roots Vacuum Pumps   vacuum pump electric
editor by CX 2024-04-17

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